CD Recorders

Yes you can as an attachment. However, the CD recording file is likely to be large. And will may be rejected by the receipents e-mail system if you can send it. Some e-mail services limit attachements to 5 MBs. A recorded CD is 650 MBs.

First, you need to understand that a CD-R is a write-once device. It cannot be re-written - though under certain conditions (multi-session, for example) you can ADD to what has been previously recorded. So you cannot record onto a commercially recorded CD. There is no write protection in the form of a "tab" on commercial media. There is CD-RW media which is an erasable kind of CD-R that can be re-written.

 

Yamaha CD recorders do not do CD Text. CD Text is a feature of the Sony Spressa Professional (SCSI) CRX140S/C, Sony Spressa USB Plus CRX100E/X2, and TEAC 12/4/32recorders we sell. In addition, your software must offer CD Text as a feature. Nero Burning ROMoffers this feature.

 

It is ILLEGAL to make unauthorized copies of copyrighted material, except for personal back-up. So if you are copying commercially available music without permission of the copyright owner, then you are indeed acting against the law - especially in Canada [where person posing questions lives]!

Stamped CDs are in a sense like the old phonograph records in that they are produced in a mold. The "pits" that form the "bits" of info - 1's & 0's in data talk - are actually a part of the mold that has polycarbonate (clear plastic) injected into it. Then a reflective surface is sprayed onto the disk, followed by a protective coating, and then it is painted.

Recordable CDs are different in that there are no pits in the polycarbonate. Instead, a dye (that is sensitive to a laser beam) is coated on the disk, followed by a reflective layer, then a protective layer. In a CD Recorder, the pits are "burned" into the dye by the laser. It is the pits that are read by audio CD players or CD-ROMs.

The quality of audio is the same from either since it is all digital. Take a look in our library for a wealth of information, including an article on how compact disks are made.

PC motherboards have two (or more) different kinds of slots for plugging in add-on cards. The PCI slot is a high-density slot (which means its has lots of connections) and is favored more than the original ISA slot. On most motherboards, the PCI slot is a white connector, and the ISA slots are black.

Mac decided to use USB (Universal Serial Bus) for an interface for CD recorders and a plethora of other things (keyboards, cameras, mice, printers, etc.) However, USB was not quite fast enough in sustained transfer speed for some disks. So they have come out with a new interface called Firewire (so named because it is supposed to be blazing fast).

As yet, we have not heard of a method of recovering the polycarbonate from CDs, except at plants that produce them in the millions, and then, only on product that is not painted. It would take quite an effort to separate the aluminum, paint, etc. from a finished CD and is neither energy nor cost effective. We share your concern for the waste, but it is better than tearing down trees! That is especially so when you consider the amount of information that can be put on a CD - about six file cabinets of paper! One person we know makes very nice Christmas tree decorations from old CDs.

We are not familiar with all the ways that are employed to attempt to protect the contents of a CD. Our experience shows that as soon as someone comes up with a way to protect the contents, five others come up with a way around the block. If a CD is meant to be read by a CD-ROM, then its contents can be put onto a hard drive. If the contents are on a hard drive, then they can be put on another CD. There are all sorts of 'tricks' that companies use to try to stop the direct duplication of a CD, but again, there are all sorts of solutions to copy them. DVDs had a fantastic protection code, but that too was broken. We certainly do not advocate the copying of copyrighted material, but a fact of life is that it happens all the time.

 

Put a blank file that is 350 Mb or so on the disk. This is going to take twice as long to burn but should achieve what you are trying to do. Also, you could simply copy whatever is in the 300 Mb twice. Otherwise, use media where it is hard to see the burn marks.

CD-ROMs are Read Only Memory devices (hence the ROM) and cannot write or record anything. CD recorders (CD-R), however, can also be used as CD-ROMs (they can both read and write). Somewhat like tape players and tape recorders.

We do not know of any CD Recorders that can be attached to a Web TV device.

The price of CD recorders is directly related to: recording and reading speed, brand name, features (SCSI vs. IDE, etc.), internal vs. external (which are the same drive, but the external is in a case with power supply, connectors, etc.) and of course market supply and demand.

All CD recorders that write CD-R and those that write CD-R and CD-RW can record an audio CD (or compile several tracks from several audio CDs). However, not every audio CD player (especially the older ones) will play CD-R media (though most will).

 

You may have the writer on a higher SCSI ID than the scanner. The scanner should be on an ID at least two higher than any recorder you have. The scanner is the slowest device on your chain, therefore should be set to ID 6.

Unfortunately No. No recorder on the market as yet can copy more than 99 audio tracks onto a CD. 99 is the maximum number of tracks with which Red Book copying can cope. Several hundred or even 1000's of MP3 files can be burned to a CD.

It is possible to burn MP3 files to a CD. However, as MP3 files, they will not play on a regular audio CD player. The files need to be converted from MP3 to WAV and then recorded to CD. The software package that we sell called Nero Burning ROM does this very well. (Of course, you do not get the advantage of the compression in MP3 when converting those files.) CDs with MP3 files can be played on MP3 enabled CD players.

Most audio CD's have a total capacity of 74 minutes or 650 Megabytes of binary data. Each byte is represented by 8 bits (a bit being a binary representation of either a 1 or a 0 - take a look at the power switch on your PC and you will see it is either ON with a 1 or OFF with a 0). So only 1's or 0's are used and not other numbers such as 2, 3, 4 etc. If you multiply 650 million by 8 then you have the total number of bits of information used to represent 74 minutes of audio.

Using the sound card in your machine (and the software that comes with it), you can copy audio tracks to your hard disk, saving them as WAV files. Then you can use Nero Burning ROM (which we sell) to record audio tracks to a CD using a CD recorder. These will not be analog files, but rather digital files.

 

All electro-mechanical devices have a life span. However the CD Recorders we sell have a 50,000 MTBF (Mean Time Between Failure) with a 25% duty cycle. What this means is that you can expect to record for 12,500 hours before a failure. Of course, this is an average and some drives will go longer without fail and some shorter. Less expensive drives may not last as long of course.

CD Burners are certainly not illegal - we would not be selling them if they were! What is illegal is the duplication of copyrighted material other than for such things as personal back-up etc. Just as copying a video tape of a movie or other copyrighted material is illegal - so is the copying of copyrighted material to a CD.

It is possible that your CD-Recorder or software cannot do disk-at-once copying. Copy the tracks to your hard drive, then burn the disk. If you still hear these sounds, run ScanDisk, Norton Utilities or similar program, then defrag. Close all applications, then write to the CD (many software programs do not allow multi-tasking while recording to CD - Nero Burning ROM does). If you still have problems, try writing at a slower speed. As a general rule, where you are copying from should be at least 2.5 times faster than where you're writing to.

 

Buffer underruns are caused when the source from which you are recording cannot keep data (which includes audio) streaming to your CD-Recorder's buffer at a steady speed. Copy the tracks to your hard drive, then burn the disk. If you still have underrun problems, run ScanDisk, Norton Utilities or similar program, then defrag. Close all applications, then write to the CD (many software programs do not allow multi-tasking while recording to CD - Nero Burning ROM does). If you still have problems, try writing at a slower speed. As a general rule, where you are copying from should be at least 2.5 times faster than where you're writing to.

Buffer underruns can also be caused by a TSR program such as Dr. Watson running in the background; a network connection causing an interrupt or a screen saver running (close all screen savers when CD recording).

Pits & lands are the bumps and grooves that represent the data on a disk dye layer which are pressed into it during manufacture. CD-R disks do not have true pits and lands, but the unmelted, clear areas and melted, opaque places in the dye layer fulfill the same function as pits and lands on a pressed disk.

Jitter is one of the possible causes of disk recording error. Jitter is actually defined as a timing problem. Simply, jitter is the result of pits on a disk being or appearing to be too short or too long, based on a certain clock cycle. For example, pits on a disk can range from what is called a 3T pit to an 11T pit. If a pit that was intended to be written as 3T varies or is perceived to vary from the length of a 3T pit beyond a certain time period, it can be interpreted incorrectly, resulting in a possible disk error. This deviation is known as jitter. The same is true for lands.

One bad pit is not a major problem, but a significant number of bad pits and lands which deviate from the norm on any one disk, and the disk can become unreadable.

Bad pits and lands are said to increase the rate of BLER dramatically. BLER stands for Block Error Rate - the raw digital error rate before any error correction, which in turn is a determining factor in the quality and readability of a given disk.

For more information, contact the CD manufacturer.

The calibration area is a special area on the disk into which the recorder writes as a test the first time you close the drawer with blank media. This is to calibrate the laser for that particular piece of media. If you simply open and close the drawer 100 times, then the area reserved for this test fills up, and you cannot calibrate the laser anymore. The solution is to use a new piece of media.

CDA files are the format that audio files are recorded on CDs. CD burning software usually takes .wav files (which are more readily edited) and converts them to CDA when making an audio CD.

In a nutshell the laser beam changes the state of a pthalocyanine or cyanine dye on the surface of the disk. The laser burns what are called 'pits' and the area where the dye is not burned is called 'lands'. Pits and lands represent ones and zeroes of a data stream. All the reader laser does is pass on this stream of ones and zeroes to the software which takes the process from there. So in simple terms a CD is a huge string of ones and zeroes.

 

It is very bad news when the silver foil is chipped off. A CD is read from the center out. You should be able to see the area that has been 'burned'. If that is where the silver is chipped off you are out of luck.

 

Tape drives on PCs are usually only used as back-up devices and not for storage of music. You could put music files on the tape drive of course but you would not be able to put that tape in a HiFi cassette player. You could however play music files on your PC.

Sorry we know of no way to do this. Our recommendation is to use CDR media and just discard rather than try and re-write. They are still very inexpensive

CDA files are the format that audio files are recorded on CDs. CD burning software usually takes .wav files (which are more readily edited) and converts them to CDA when making an audio CD.

In a nutshell the laser beam changes the state of a pthalocyanine or cyanine dye on the surface of the disk. The laser burns what are called 'pits' and the area where the dye is not burned is called 'lands'. Pits and lands represent ones and zeroes of a data stream. All the reader laser does is pass on this stream of ones and zeroes to the software which takes the process from there. So in simple terms a CD is a huge string of ones and zeroes.

It is very bad news when the silver foil is chipped off. A CD is read from the center out. You should be able to see the area that has been 'burned'. If that is where the silver is chipped off you are out of luck.

Tape drives on PCs are usually only used as back-up devices and not for storage of music. You could put music files on the tape drive of course but you would not be able to put that tape in a HiFi cassette player. You could however play music files on your PC.

Sorry we know of no way to do this. Our recommendation is to use CDR media and just discard rather than try and re-write. They are still very inexpensive.

 

The recorder itself is not what controls the gaps between tracks but rather the software that drives the recorder and which mode of recording you are using. The Nero software has the ability in Disk at Once mode (DAO) to have a 0 second inter-track gap and this can be increased to whatever you want. So what you would need to do is record to the hard disk each segment of music you want as a track on the CD. This is done using the sound card line input on your PC. Then copy those tracks to the CD with a 0 second track gap. Nero would allow you to do the latter easily.

First let's distinguish between CD-R and CD-RW. CDR is a 'write once' technology and you cannot erase, change etc what you have written. You can incrementally add to CDR if the disk is not 'closed' - i.e. finalized. A disk that is not closed usually cannot be read on other machines. CD-RW means re-writeable and this technology allows for erasing and re-writing what you have written. It uses a technology known as 'packet writing'. This is achieved with a different program than is normally used with CD recording. You can drag and drop files as well as erase them etc. So this could do what you describe. Packet writing software is included with CDR software such as Nero it is called InCD and is installed separately to Nero. The only caveat is that you must use CDRW media (of course).

All of the CD recorders we sell will record audio without any loss and the disks will play in just about any audio or CD ROM machine. The disks we sell are CDR and will not work with home recorders that require CDR-DA (Music) media. The latter has what is known as AHRA encoding which involves a royalty paid to the music industry. They cannot be copied - i.e. you cannot make a copy of a copy.

MP3 is a form of compressing digital audio files. It typically achieves a compression of 12:1, which means the file is about one twelfth the size and t herefore does not take up much space. The biggest fuss about MP3 is Napster, a company that arranges for the transfer of MP3 files, which is being sued by the recording industry for violating copyrights on music. It has really shaken up the recording industry. With Napster you can download just about any piece of music without paying the artist for his/her work. MP3 is a standard set by the Motion Picture Equipment Group (MPEG) and is really short for MPEG Level 3.

An internal drive is one that is mounted in a PC case along with the motherboard, hard disk etc. External is one mounted in a separate case and connected to the PC with an umbilical cord.SCSI is the most sophisticated and capable of disk drive interfaces. Others include IDE, USB etc.

There is no difference between a data CDR disk and an audio CDR disk unless the audio CDR disk is marked CDR-DA Music Only. Those disks are more expensive and include a royalty to the music industry. They are specifically for HiFi CD recorders that are not attached to computers. They are what are called AHRA encoded, which prevents making a copy of a copy. That is not the case with regular CDR disks. However the HiFi CD recorders will ONLY write on CDR-DA disks. If your CD writer is attached to your computer then odds are you can easily write an audio CD on the far less expensive CDR media and it will play on just about any audio CD player.Nero software is a superb package for writing not only audio but also data CDs.

 

There are a few essential items you need to record CD+G disks (Karaoke). The first is a CD Recorder that will record CD+G. The Yamahas, Plextors and Panasonics we sell will do this (TEAC will not nor many others). Second you need software capable of copying CD+G and the Padus DiscJuggler we sell will do that as well as allow compilation CD+G disks. Third you need a CDRom drive capable of reading CD+G.

The Panasonic 7503 is a SCSI device. There are no native USB or Firewire drives in the market at this point. However there are 'bridge' products that use either IDE or SCSI drives with an interface attached that converts to USB or Firewire. USB has difficulty sustaining the data rate necessary for even 4x recording.

 

The salesman certainly knows what he is talking about and yes there are royalties attached to the cost of CDR DA (Music) CDs. The recording device you have also will not copy a copy because of the copyright protection.

You cannot legally duplicate copyrighted material and sell for profit (or even give it away). You can make compilations for your own use however. The store you saw doing this pays a royalty through ASCAP (watchdog of the recording industry) for each copy of a track that it sells.

 

Just about any HiFi receiver has a line input (with 2 RCA stereo sockets at the back - they are usually red for left and white for right channels). The external CD recorders we sell have corresponding line outputs for audio. Internal CDRs have a line output too however they do not have regular RCA jacks but four in-line pins.

The CD Recorders are rated at a Mean Time Between Failure (MTBF) of 25,000 to 50,000 Power On Hours with a 25% duty cycle. The lower figure is for lower end devices and the higher one for drives such as Yamaha etc. The 25% duty cycle means they are being used to burn CDs a quarter of the time they are turned on.

So it should be pretty easy for you to do the math from there. Remember this is the MTBF and some drives will last longer and some less than this time.

As of this writing Napster is still operating, pending a court review of the RIAA (Recording Industry Association of America) request for an injunction to shut them down. So yes you can download files from Napster and they come in the MP3 format. Nero Burning Rom software will take MP3 files and covert them to the WAV format which is necessary for recording to make a regular audio CD. The process is a simple drag and drop operation.

A CD recorder (burner) is a drive capable (with appropriate software etc) of writing/mastering a CD. It is usually attached to a computer though there are 'HI FI' versions that fit in stereo systems. CD Duplicators have one or more CD recorders in them and are usually stand alone devices that accept a recorded CD and make copies of them. Think of a duplicator as a paper copier or Xerox machine.

The Nero package will do precisely what you want to do. You will need a recorder that does disk at once recording. You can drag the .WAV file into the compilation window then double click on it. Then you will be able to edit the file and split it into as many tracks as you want with 0 seconds between tracks. You can also do cross fading, filtering etc.

See the CD Recorders we sell (along with appropriate software) can indeed make copies of audio CDs. You can certainly make a compilation CD, taking a track from this and then a track from that CD etc. Recorded (rather than 'pressed') CDs will play in just about any audio player, except some older models that have a low sensitivity laser pickup. The reflectivity of recorded CDs is about 70% of pressed CDs. CDRW media has only approximately 50% of the reflectivity of pressed CDs and therefore does not work in a majority of audio CD players.

If you use Nero software, it will convert the MP3 format to CD-DA (compact disk-digital audio) which is what is required by audio CD players. If you copy the file as an MP3 file, it will only be playable on the very new CD/DVD players that have an MP3 decoder built into them. Of course, when you convert to CD-DA, you lose the compression advantage of MP3. Note: Some new CD players are coming on the market that can read and play MP3 files that are recorded onto a CD. They can also play regular audio CDs.